Advent 2022 at First Pres

Special Events

Gingerbread House Decorating – Sunday, December 11, 3 p.m.

Learn more and register here!

Christmas Eve – Saturday, December 24, 2022

4 p.m. Family Service – In person in the First Pres Sanctuary AND online.
10 p.m. Candlelight Service – In person in the First Pres Sanctuary AND online.

Christmas Day – Sunday, December 25, 2022

9:30 a.m. Worship Service – In person in the First Pres Sanctuary AND online.

New Year’s Day – Sunday, January 1, 2023

9:30 a.m. Worship Service – In person in the First Pres Sanctuary AND online.

Download our 2022 Christmas Activity Kit here!
(PDF format – 2.6 mb)

The Church’s Song
Our All-Church Adult Ed Class for Advent

Learn about the history of church worship!

The ABCs of Advent
We think of them as the three kings, but today we believe the Magi were a specific caste of religious Assyrians who were schooled in astrology. When they arrived in Jerusalem looking for a new child king, it stunned not only Herod, the king of Judea, but all the people, too.

Follow our ABCs of Advent each day through Christmas! You can see the previous days’ posts at https://firstpresevanston.org/advent2022!
#FPCEAdvent2022
The Good News begins with the message of the angel Gabriel to Zechariah in Luke, Chapter 1. We begin the season of Advent with our worship service today at 9:30 a.m. at https://live.firstpresevanston.org or in person at First Pres, 1427 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, 60201.

Follows our ABCs of Advent each day through Christmas! #FPCEAdvent2022
Advent begins tomorrow! Join us each day as we look at the ABCs of Advent, leading up to our Christmas Eve and Christmas Day services. Learn more at https://firstpresevanston.org/advent2022/. #FPCEAdvent2022
500 years before the birth of Christ, the Prophet Micah foretold the coming of the Messiah to the people of Israel (Micah 5:2). Today, we celebrate the fulfillment of that promise and await the fullness of our hope with the return of Jesus, the resurrected Christ!

Follow our ABCs of Advent each day through Christmas! You can see the previous days’ posts at https://firstpresevanston.org/advent2022!

#FPCEAdvent2022
Kings, rulers, and other leaders often measure their power by counting how many people they are in charge of. God used Caesar's earthly desire to lead Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem and fulfill what the prophets had said.

Follow our ABCs of Advent each day through Christmas! You can see the previous days’ posts at https://firstpresevanston.org/advent2022!
#FPCEAdvent2022
In 2 Samuel 7, God promises David that the kingdom of his ancestors will be established forever. By detailing the lineage of Jesus back to David and all the way to Abraham, the Scriptures illustrate God’s faithfulness and his sovereignty over all of history, including our own!

Follow our ABCs of Advent each day through Christmas! You can see the previous days’ posts at https://firstpresevanston.org/advent2022!
#FPCEAdvent2022
Mary is already overjoyed at having become pregnant. Her son would become John the Baptist. When Mary arrives to visit, her joy overflows as the Holy Spirit reveals to her the secret of Mary’s pregnancy. May our Christmas be so full of the Holy Spirit that we overflow with joy, too!

Follow our ABCs of Advent each day through Christmas! You can see the previous days’ posts at https://firstpresevanston.org/advent2022!
#FPCEAdvent2022
Fathers are important players in the Christmas narrative. Zechariah and  Joseph get plenty of attention, but the greatest father of all is, of course, God. His sending Jesus to be born among us is the most powerful act of parental love in all of history.

Follow our ABCs of Advent each day through Christmas! You can see the previous days’ posts at https://firstpresevanston.org/advent2022!
#FPCEAdvent2022

Advent Preaching Themes

November 27 – First Sunday of Advent
Text: Isaiah 2:1-5
Theme: The view from the mountain top
Big Idea: God’s kingdom provides a hope-filled view of life on the ground.
Notes: Advent is a time of hope and longing, but also a time of repentance. Isaiah reminds Israel (and us) that we can’t appreciate the promise without hearing the judgment. If there is no need, there is nothing for which to hope.  

Isaiah 2:1–5 foresees the day when one holy mountain will stand supreme, reducing all others to utter insignificance. In this sense Isaiah’s vision is exclusive. It is also inclusive, however, because it envisages all nations and many peoples coming to Zion to share with Israel in the blessings of the Lord’s rule. Finally, it is a vision of universal peace, described in terms which have reverberated down through the centuries.

December 4Communion Sunday Second Sunday of Advent
Text: Isaiah 11:1-10
Theme: The view from the valley
Big Idea: The realities of life in this world will not prevent the redemptive work of God’s servant. 
Notes: Isaiah 11 reminds us that while we live in a violent world, God will not rest until peace captures the hearts and minds of all people and nations.  God will not stop making peace until all predators and prey, as well as all enemies live together in peace. Here the shoot/Branch is a metaphor for the Messiah, through whose advent and rule this will be accomplished.

December 11Third Sunday of Advent/Lessons and Carols
Text: Isaiah 35:1-10

December 18 – Fourth Sunday of Advent/ Children’s Pageant
Text: Isaiah 7:10-16

December 24Christmas Eve
Text: Isaiah 9:2-7
Theme: Light shining into the darkness
Big Idea: In the Messiah, light overcomes the darkness of sin
Notes: The world seeks feverishly for a politician, or a technology to change its sorry conditions. Isaiah predicts a time that God’s Messiah is the one to deliver us from all the bondage, violence, and unhappiness that infects this world. Isaiah calls him a Wonderful Counselor and the Prince of Peace. 

December 25Christmas Day and Last Sunday of 2022
Text: John 1:1-14
Theme: In praise of a materialistic Christmas
Big Idea: The message of Christmas celebrates the unseen God taking a tangible, visible body.
Notes: C.S. Lewis was right when he said the greatest miracle of all time was not the atonement, and it was not even the resurrection. The greatest miracle of all time was the incarnation. To think that the almighty God of heaven condescended to come to earth born of a virgin, and then to sleep in a stable with the animals as a commoner—defied conventional wisdom of the Greco-Roman world.